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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild


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What is your favourite feature of Breath of the Wild?

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#61 Ocelot

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 05:37 AM

TELL ME YOUR ZELDA STORIES, YOU GUYS! THIS GAME IS OUT!

 

I'm experiencing double wonderment here, because I've decided to play this game fully in Japanese. It's kind of a rude awakening, because I have nowhere near the level of skill one needs to actually play a video game in Japanese with any degree of fluency, but I figure what better way of studying a language than just jumping in? There are only so many kanji flashcards my brain can take in in a day. So I'm a stranger in a strange land just through the general premise of the game, but also because I only half-understand what anyone is saying to me and I have to refer to an online dictionary like twice every sentence. But, hey, maybe by the time I make my way to Calamity Ganon I'll actually have built some fluency. I hope.

 

Anyway, ZELDAAAAA! I finally made it off the plateau today, after hours just running around doing all the things I've been dreaming of doing since they first showed off the game at E3. I tried using Stasis to store a bunch of momentum in that big rock and ride it off the plateau (turns out you can't grab onto the rock, and standing on top of it when it shoots off just hurts you :P), and I fought everyone I could find with every weapon I could find. I didn't manage to find the warm clothes, so I had to eat some roasted fire-flower things and scoot my way up the frozen mountain before the warming effect wore off. 

 

But now I'm off the plateau, and I'm looking forward to spending the next fifty hours just finding shrines and horsies and secret stuff and maybe even moving the story forward. The first horses I saw were being ridden around by a band of Bokoblins, and after my initial plan to snipe one off his steed and sneak in to take it for myself went completely awry, I somehow made a one-in-a-million bowshot to knock a Bokoblin off his horse right as he was bearing down on me at full speed. It was the greatest thing ever, and now my horse and I are buddies for life. I tried taking him to the stable to register him, but they wanted 20 Rupees and I hadn't even seen a Rupee at that point in the game, so I just rode around some more until eventually I found a merchant. Now he's mine, though. I named him Hol Horse after that putz on JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, because his was the first name that came to mind and it made me giggle.

 

Now I'm just lost in a loop of spotting a shrine on the horizon, heading towards it, realising it's actually more difficult to reach than I thought, but then finding another shrine on the way and jumping in there instead. It's great. 

 

EDIT - I came across a Bokoblin camp that was being terrorised by a wild boar, and just sat there watching the spectacle for a few minutes. The boar took down half the Bokoblins before finally succumbing, so I just came in and cleaned up the stragglers with a poking stick, then looted everything in the camp (including a nice boar steak) for myself.

 

I find it really cool how natural geographic features can actually be genuine obstacles for you in this game. Like, in any other game a river is just something you swim across, y'know? In Breath of the Wild, rivers actually have currents, so even if you do have the stamina to make it to the other side, you aren't just going to cross straight over. You might have to cook yourself some medicine that'll increase your stamina or movement speed, or just go further downstream and look for a crossing point. Imagine that. This world isn't locked away from you by invisible walls or any other video game-y things; it's just hard to get places because you're a little guy in a massive world.

 

Hol Horse and I have been galloping all up and down the place having a grand old time. My new approach to Bokoblin camps is just to trample everyone under Hol Horse's hooves, which I feel is a nice way of getting loot without using resources. My weapons may degrade, but Hol Horse's capacity for brutal murder is infinite. At the last camp I massacred I decided to jump into some cooking, and it's the most wonderfully addictive thing. I WANT TO COOK ALL THE THINGS!

 

EDIT - So I haven't even done the first story objective after leaving the plateau, but I think I've actually stumbled across the route the story would have taken me by accident, which says a lot for the way this world has been crafted. Without following a waypoint or even being told which direction to go in, I've just sort of gravitated towards the areas Nintendo's designed for me. I was worried that such a huge world would feel pretty barren and empty, something like Metal Gear Solid V, where the world is basically just empty nothingness with the actual authored content dotted about at random. BotW just isn't, though; the world feels alive in a way I don't think I've ever experienced; it strikes this perfect balance between not feeling too empty, but also not feeling like it's been very stiffly designed to have X number of things per Y number of square miles, y'know? It's rly good.

 

I've come across some Shrines with a really awful motion control gimmick, though. You have to interact with some big gyro objects and flip and rotate a big object in 3D space to roll a ball into a goal or create a path for yourself, and it's terrible. For all Nintendo's talked up the Switch's motion controls, this feels like all the worst Sixaxis/Wiimote waggle rubbish I'd hope we were past by now. Eventually I worked out I could detach the JoyCons and just spin the right one around in my hands, but the control is so poor and imprecise, and it freaks out when you go upside down, that it's just an absolute chore. Worst part of the game by a long way, unfortunately.

 

EDIT - I've been trying to get back to Kakariko to see the big fellow with the maracas to expand my inventory size, but I keep getting distracted and before I know it I've spent three hours just exploring and I can't break free. There are so many amazing things to discover and I want to see them all. I just got annihilated by a terrifying Centaur on top of a mountain. I also fought my way through a handful of combat Shrines, which wiped out my whole inventory but then refilled it with some awesome Guardian weapons, and the chest in the last one had a sleeveless shirt that increases my climbing speed. Two tickets to the Link gun show, please. I'm never taking it off again.

 

EDIT - This game? It's pretty good, you guys. I haven't felt this way about a game since Witcher 3, which is not to say that they're all that similar, just that they both just own my soul. I want to explore every inch of this world. I'm finding so many incredible things and I'm loving every moment of it.



#62 Saber-Scorpion

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 05:46 PM

Ocelot, you fooled me into looking in here because of that title! I thought maybe they actually renamed it to that.

 

Honestly though, I would like to play this game. Wish I didn't have to buy a whole Nintendo console just to play it... :[


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#63 Ocelot

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 09:21 PM

Hurr hurr, I was just in a thread title pun kind of mood and it was the first thing that came to me :P

 

So one thing I'm realising now that I'm actually starting to touch the main quest of this game (after like thirty hours of exploring), is just how interesting it is to actually go places. For example, this game does have the Iconic Ubisoft Towers that are now mandated in all open world games. However, after climbing a tower (which is often not as easy as it sounds) and syncing your Hylian iPad with it, you don't get the customary Iconic Ubisoft shotgun spatter of icons infesting your map. Instead, that region of your map goes from a featureless blue fog of war to an actual topographic map of the land and geographical features of the area, with names for all the rivers, islands, mountains and towns contained within. Like, y'know, a map. A two-dimensional depiction of an area of the Earth which one uses to find one's way. Like a map map.

 

Which is awesome, because this game doesn't give you waypoints so much as directions. Quest-givers don't tell you that such-and-such needs so-and-so-ing and then just magically pop a glowing marker onto your... mental image of the world, I guess, like most RPGs. In Breath of the Wild they'll say things like, "Yo, there's a guy I think you should meet. If you head directly East of here, follow the river and then turn North when you can, you'll find the village where he lives, and then ask around for him". And then you just do it, and you find that guy, and you feel like the coolest duder who ever lived. I'm playing in the game's Pro Mode, which is where it turns off the entire HUD, and not having a minimap to follow makes you even more reliant on reading the lay of the land and planning your routes. There's a gorgeously designed world out there to explore, and it's just an absolute delight.

 

Now I'm going to focus on making some money for a little while, because there are so many things I want to buy and I can't afford any of them. I found the Rito Village, and there is SUCH A COOL set of clothes there that I simply must have, but I need to make an extra 1000 Rupees or something, so my plan is to go and mine some gems (by blowing up ore deposits, of course) and sell'em.

 

I also found a happy Goron friend who runs a golf course at the bottom of a valley.



#64 Risk

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 05:59 AM

I played this for a couple of hours at my buddy's house, immediately adopted a Solid Snake gameplay style of hiding under barrels and detonating magical C4 charges on those goblin things, along with being generally sneaky.


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#65 Ocelot

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 08:46 PM

After over fifty hours of playing this game, I've just completed my first dungeon. It was... well, it was basically just a longer shrine, but it did have a pretty cool boss at the end. I feel like this will probably be my only major complaint about the game when all is said and done. I mean, there are 120 Shrines in this game, so if you add up all the pure dungeon-ing it probably has significantly more of it than any Zelda in series history. But at the same time, the vast majority of them are bite-size puzzle rooms, and even in the longer ones there's no sign of the giant, entire-dungeon-spanning mechanisms that can keep you working away at the same puzzle for hours at a time. I've explored some excellent shrines, but they're all just 'do it and then it's done' kind of things, y'know? Not bad, and honestly pretty nice for a quick pick-up-and-play session on the Switch, but that ol' Zelda dungeon feeling isn't there.

 

I did the Rito dungeon first, which is to say that big ol' mechanical bird monster we saw flying around in the trailers. I really enjoyed the leadup to the dungeon (exactly how do you think Link would reach a great big thing up in the sky?), and the dungeon had a reasonably neat gimmick to it that I actually only realised right near the very end. I got a really cool new ability to use in regular gameplay after I beat the dungeon, but after trying it out a couple of times I realised that you can only use it a handful of times before you have to sit through a cooldown timer, which really put a damper on it for me.

 

Anyway, I've explored aaaalmost everywhere in the world now. I've visited most of the cities, including the Gerudo city in the desert that's entirely populated by seven foot Amazon goddesses who all look like they could squat triple bodyweight. God, the thighs in that place! They don't allow men in the city, so I had to do a bit of questing to find some women's clothes to fool them (lucky Link is so conveniently androgynous :P). It's a cool place, and the princess there wants me to go and find an electrical helmet of some kind, which I assume will allow me to climb onto the giant mechanical camel that's stomping around in the middle of a sandstorm.

 

I still haven't visited the Zora's Domain (every Zora I meet tells me that the Zora Prince is on the lookout for a strong young man), but right now I really want to find a way up Death Mountain to find the Goron City. There are a whole bunch of shrines I can see around Death Mountain, but I can't get close because Link's body LITERALLY CATCHES FIRE when I get too close to the volcano. I'm going to look through my ingredients and see if I can brew something up for now, but I know there's a sick set of fireproof armour out there somewhere.



#66 Rune Walsh

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 07:36 PM


 

I still haven't visited the Zora's Domain (every Zora I meet tells me that the Zora Prince is on the lookout for a strong young man), but right now I really want to find a way up Death Mountain to find the Goron City. There are a whole bunch of shrines I can see around Death Mountain, but I can't get close because Link's body LITERALLY CATCHES FIRE when I get too close to the volcano. I'm going to look through my ingredients and see if I can brew something up for now, but I know there's a sick set of fireproof armour out there somewhere.

 

Just a heads up regarding Death Mountain: Heat Resistance won't do a thing for you, what you need is Flame Guard.

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#67 Ocelot

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:36 PM

Hah, yeah, I worked that out when I tried to wear my Gerudo belly dancer outfit to the volcano :P

 

Anyway, I finished the Death Mountain dungeon, which was so similar to the Rito dungeon that I'm guessing they're all going to be variations on the same theme. Bit disappointing, especially since it seems like the bosses are more or less the same, too, but they're still enjoyable enough. The leadups to the dungeons have been a bit more memorable than the dungeons themselves so far; they've been nice one-off setpieces that are delightfully different to anything else in the game, whereas the dungeons are basically just longer shrines.

 

Now I'm knee-deep in the Gerudo tribe's problems, mowing down hordes of desert ninjas, and I suppose from there I'll go off and see what the Zoras are all about, and at some point I need to go off and explore the Lost Woods. I think I'll keep pecking away at this game for months to come because it's so easy to just pop my Switch out of the dock to hunt down a quick shrine or two, but I do want to finish up the meat of the game before I get too swamped in other awesome games that need playing. I'm sure I'll post a big diatribe about the game when I've beaten Ganon, but for now my thoughts are that it's excellent, and, though it's by no means perfect, none of the flaws have been anywhere near serious enough to hamper any of the delightful adventuring I've been doing.

 

EDIT - The Gerudo dungeon was really cool! Pretty good bossfight at the end, too. Now I've reached the Zora hometown and it's gawrgeous.

 

EDIT - Alright, you guys. All four dungeons are down, and I'm standing right in front of the Master Sword after having made it through the Lost Woods. With 19 hearts, a second full stamina wheel and an inventory full of full heals, I'm thinking it's about that time, though first I want to do another lap of the world to see if I can track down the last few memory photos I'm missing. Eventually I'm going to come back with a guide to track down all the Shrines and sidequests I missed, but right now I'm ready to go and put the hurt on a certain Calamity. I can hear Nier Automata calling me :P



#68 Ocelot

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:02 AM

k, with 70-something hours played, Ganon defeated, 80ish Shrines completed and all Memories watched, I think it's about time to type up a big long-winded love-letter (with a healthy amount of criticism) to this wonderful game.

 

It's really good, you guys. I don't think it's perfect, and in fact it has some pretty obvious flaws, but I honestly think it's something really special in spite of all that. If you take all its separate parts, which is to say an open world with Ubisoft Towers, survival elements and breakable weapons like any number of Steam indie games, non-linear progression and questing like them there Fallouts and Skyrims, and any number of other concepts we've already seen in other games, it doesn't sound like anything especially remarkable. We saw it all over the internet when the game was revealed last E3: "Look at all these Nintendo kiddies getting excited over their Skyrim clone, durrrrr". What makes Breath of the Wild stand out in an industry full of giant worlds to explore and adventures to go on and towers to climb?

 

Well shut up and I'll tell you: it's the fact that it takes all those disparate elements from all those other games and mixes them all together, throwing all caution and common wisdom to the wind, and it does it all with the kind of cleverness, wit, and impeccable standard of quality we expect from a truly special Nintendo game. Layered on top of a really well-designed, hand-crafted world map are a series of systems governing basically everything you do. The weather can become too hot or too cold for Link, or block his path up a mountain with rain, or force him to stow away all his metal objects in a thunderstorm. The wind will blow you around while Parasailing, or affect the spread of fire. Said fire can be set by Link in any number of ways, or it can come from enemies, or it can just start randomly from a lightning strike. That river you want to swim across might have a fast-flowing current, so maybe you'll take a boat, but oh wait that boat is tied to the dock, and there's no prompt to untie the rope... Oh, wait. It's a rope. You have a sword. You know what to do.

 

It's a video game world where if you think you can do something, you can probably do it. Everything just kind of works. I had a moment where I needed to melt some ice, but I didn't have any fire weapons or fire arrows on me. I had flint in my inventory, though, and there were plenty of trees around, so I cut one down to make some firewood. I laid out the firewood and flint, struck it with my sword and, bamzo, fire. But how to get the fire to the ice? Well, if I had any wooden weapons I could simply have set them on fire, but instead I decided to fire some wooden arrows through the fire. It was then that I realised I could just nock an arrow, then walk up to the fire to light the arrow without firing it, then walk over to the ice and just hold my flaming arrow up against it. And I bet there were like five other ways of getting past those ice blocks that I never would have thought of, too, because this is just that kind of game. It's all there waiting for you, you just have to recognise it.

 

And the most remarkable thing is that everything you can do in this game is available to you almost from the very beginning. The Great Plateau acts as a brief tutorial, setting you up with your main Sheikah Stone powers while also wordlessly teaching you how to survive out in the wild (a tutorial so elegant and succinct it's hard to believe it came from the same studio responsible for Twilight Princess and Skyward Sword, btw). Once you've got those four powers, though, you're ready to go. Every obstacle in the game can be overcome, every puzzle can be solved, with nothing but the clever application of those powers. Yet if you're anything like me, this game will still surprise you dozens of hours later as it gently guides you towards a totally new use of one of your powers you'd never even considered before. You'd been able to do it from moment one, you just hadn't realised it. I had no idea I could detonate my two kinds of bombs separately, for example, or create ice blocks on vertical surfaces to climb waterfalls, or use Magnesis to manipulate metal swords to complete electrical circuits until I found myself in Shrines that gave me the opportunity to discover those techniques for myself. No words, no handholding partner character, just "Yo, here's a puzzle, I trust you to work it out".

 

Developers trusting the player? What is this, the 1980s? Did I accidentally fall through a time portal to an age before the video game industry decided we were all gibbering morons? How am I going to work out puzzle solutions if Fi doesn't tell me that there's an 87% chance that I should hit that lever over there to open the door? Oh, I just... use my brain? I just call upon my experience playing other video games and living life in the world? Huh, that could actually work...

 

Also, on the subject of that Nintendo polish, I find it quite stunning that, for all this game's staggering scale, I honestly haven't experienced one single instant of open-world jank. Like, literally nothing; I kind of can't believe it. Open worlds are notorious for jank, to the point that we just accept it as part of the genre, and an open world with a strong emphasis on a physics system is a recipe for disaster. Yet somehow Breath of the Wild is immaculate. From exploring the open world, to solving puzzles within shrines, to getting into huge fights with enemies and abusing all the various fire propagation and weapon throwing and enemy AI and rune magic systems all at once, I have never seen this game put a foot wrong. Well, the framerate's a bit rubbish, but that's honestly it.

 

And this world is a genuine joy to explore, with delightful new places to discover around every turn and a lighthearted tone and style that's refreshingly different to everything else out there. Forests are alive with wildlife, birds and insects, towns are full of friendly people with nice faces, and even the enemies have a certain jauntiness to them that makes them a whole lot of goofy fun to fight. It's an absolutely gorgeous game from top to bottom, even if it is held back by Nintendo's perpetually underpowered hardware. Maybe the HD Remaster on Nintendo's next console will do it justice for real, but for now it's still a lovely experience.

 

Anyway, I could gush about the good stuff forever, but it's about time to get negative, so let's assume our usual miserable, jaded demeanours and suck the fun out of life! I'll do this bit as bullet points, just for funsies:

 

- There's no equivalent of the classic 3D Zelda dungeon. Most Shrines are around five minutes long (though there are somewhat more lengthy ones), and the 'main' dungeons are maybe half an hour or so. And there are only four of those. Count up all 120 Shrines and four Divine Beasts and you might come to a similar number of overall puzzling time as the other 3D Zeldas, but when it's all in bite-size chunks there's no opportunity to really nut out one huge puzzle for two or three hours like all my favourite for-realsies dungeons.

 

- There are some really excellent sidequests that involve deciphering clues and following real-world directions (not glowing waypoints) to find hidden goodies. There are also an awful lot of fetchquests. Bring me 10 lizards, Link, and I shall give you a thing in return. Please make me a curry, Link. Oh, Link, just the man I wanted to see: I need seven durians that only grow in one specific part of the world. Et cetera.

 

- Much has been made of the weapon durability, and while I don't hate it at all, I do think it could use work. It's pretty cool in the early hours where all the weapons you find will be taken from enemies, and they'll break quickly but there'll always be more where that came from. You'll club a couple of Bokoblins, throw your club at the next one right before it breaks, then pick one up from a defeated foe and keep swinging; all without having to futz with the menu. However, later on you'll acquire an inventory full of cool weapons, and you won't want to use any of them because you know they'll just break. Fighting enemies out in the world becomes a bad value proposition: you're only going to break good weapons and come away with bad ones. It kind of sucks the joy out of opening chests because 1: your limited inventory space means you're going to have to close the chest immediately, throw away your worst weapon, then open the chest again to get the new one, and 2: that cool new weapon you just found is just going to break after you hit a few dudes with it anyway.

 

- Enemy variety leaves a lot to be desired. The world itself has incredible variety, but the enemies you fight within it are simply reskins of the same old dudes everywhere you go. Even the four bosses of the four main dungeons are basically just Ganon wearing different hats with different attack patterns.

 

- The English voice acting is surprisingly bad. I liked all the Japanese voices, but when I looked up some of the memories in English on Youtube I was quite taken aback; it sounds like they hired random people off the street, and everything has that awkward feel of English sentences being squished into the lip-sync of Japanese dialogue.

 

So I don't think Breath of the Wild perfectly executes on everything it sets out to do, but I think it gets pretty close. It'll be incredibly interesting to see where Nintendo goes from here, because Breath of the Wild feels like a huge milestone for the series in the same way Ocarina of Time did. Majora's Mask, Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, Skyward Sword; all of those games followed in Ocarina's footsteps. But Breath of the Wild breaks the mold and goes off in an entirely new direction. And just like Ocarina, I can't wait to see how Nintendo will build on this groundwork in the Zelda games to come. I don't need every Zelda from here on out to be a massive open world, but I would love to see a Majora's-Mask-style take on Breath of the Wild, for example.

 

I forgot to mention how fun it was dressing Link up in all the different costumes, or blasting around in the desert behind a sand walrus that sounds like a freight train, or how much I enjoyed taking selfies in my own home in Hateno Town with all the awesome weapons I'd collected hanging on the walls behind me, or my stable of wonderful horsies I caught and named (I think this game has my favourite horses ever). I 'finished' this game days ago, but I still play it regularly. There's always something more to do, be it a sidequest or a shrine or another picture to fill out my Hyrule Compendium, but mostly I just think it's a wonderful game, and a wonderful place to spend some time.

 

Breath of the Wild, you guys. I recommend it.



#69 Ryoma

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:54 AM

Ocey, I am disappoint in you. You didn't mention the performance issues! :P I'm playing on the WiiU, and whenever I enter a town or anything more involved than wide-open spaces or empty shrines, the framerate chugs. I don't know how low it goes, but if I had to guess, I would say between 15 and 20. It's really bad. When I was doing one of the dungeons, it actually made me miss a button prompt and I had to rapidly press the button long before the prompt appeared to actually do it.

 

But, I am overall enjoying the game. It has some serious problems, both performance and otherwise, but it's real fun. I haven't encountered any jank myself, which I agree is incredible. Pop-in could be reduced (I have a tendency to fly to enemy camps that look abandoned until I'm right on top of them) but there aren't any weird character animations or oddities that I've seen.

 

My favorite part is the enemies. When you steal their weapons, they point at you all upset and it never, EVER, gets old.

 

I also love how you get basically everything at the start. I really think this game would annoy me more if it had the normal Zelda progression, because then I would enter Shrines and not be sure I could solve them. Then, I'd have to backtrack. I'm really glad whenever I get to a shrine, I have all the tools to solve it, and I can just do it. One shrine had me light 5 torches using a rotation thing and you needed to avoid the water. After lighting four, I shot the last one with a fire arrow, expecting it not to light, but lo and behold, I finished the puzzle. Twas cool.

 

I think my other big gripe not mentioned by Ocelot is the UI design. It's pretty...awful. When you find a chest with an item in it, you have to open the chest > view item > message that inventory is full > pause > Scroll to Inventory > Select Item > Select Drop > Unpause > Open Treasure Chest > Get message of Item. It's stupid clunky. Same goes with cooking. Why can't I press A on a fire and have my cooking menu just open? Having to hold things (and if you hold the wrong thing,you have to start over) is just plain annoying. 

 

These are small nitpicks, sure, but they grind my gears just the same. It's just kind of Nintendo nonsense rearing its ugly head. But it has a lot of Nintendo polish in a lot of other areas (framerate notwithstanding) and I'm having a good time with it.

 

Also this guy:

 

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Shark-man Husbando.



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#70 Risk

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 11:50 PM

So every time I slowly chip away at BotW over at my buddy's place, I discover something mindblowingly new about that game.

 

I'm just starting out, so I'm exploring and taking on those goblin things, so I don't have many arrows to do those SICK NASTY BIG AIR shots while falling from a jump, so I'm mostly stuck to melee combat. Well, I kill a whole camp of these things, and there's one guy at a tower. I pull out my jank wooden shield and block his arrows, but I accidentally put the shield away. It puts the arrow in my inventory. For some reason that blew my mind so hard. I kept doing it like ten times more, farming arrows off of this gullible goblin. My friend had put well over 100 hours into the game before me, and he was astounded by that.


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#71 Joker

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 12:58 PM

*Rant*

 

You forgot to mention the biggest negative, the rain and climbing. Who's brilliant idea was it to have a random "YOU CAN'T CLIMB ANYMORE" generator in a game about exploring where at least 50% of exploring is being latched onto a mountain wall? It's the gaming equivalent of your mom telling you that you need to take a break from that gosh darn vidya game and do something else for a bit. There is literally nothing you can do to counter the rain except wait it out for around 5 IRL minutes. You can't build a fire to skip it in game cause it's raining, and you can't sleep at an inn because then you need to teleport away from the place you were gonna explore with the likelihood of it starting to pour down again as soon as you reach the same point being incredibly high. It rains around 5 times every day in Hyrule apparently and Link is in desperate need of some sort of anti-slip gear which doesn't exist in the game. 

 

For example, I was doing one of those find the korok flower mini games so to speak, chased down three of them at ground level, then the fourth one popped up on top of a pillar. Easy peasy I say as I grab onto the pillar and start climbing, halfway up it starts raining, Link slips and I simply have to wait it out.



#72 Ryoma

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 08:06 AM

I forgot to complain about the rain too. It's awful.



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#73 Ocelot

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 01:15 AM

Link desperately needs some kind of spiked gloves because... yeah, the rain is terrible. Joker's exactly right: when you want to climb that cliff, you just want to climb that cliff, and rain is basically just a random countdown timer until you're allowed to climb again.

 

Also, yep, the open-chest-"inventory-full"-close-chest-clear-out-inventory-open-chest-again loop is stupid, and the framerate can be really bad. These are all things that could probably be fixed in a patch really easily, though, so it'll be interesting to see if Nintendo does anything about them. 

 

In the meantime, I found this nice Uruboza fan art for us all to gaze upon and feel inadequate in comparison to. Beefcake Gerudos might be my favourite thing about this game :P

 

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#74 Ryoma

Ryoma

    There's something weird in Gravity Falls.

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 07:24 PM

I take back what I said about Open World Jank. I just had a Goron pop-in right in front of my horse and I ran said Goron over.

 

He was happy to sell me rocks afterward tho.

 

45 Shrines. About to climb Death Mountain.

 

I don't have a lot of time for games these days.



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If I'm not the smart guy, who am I?

 

 


#75 Ocelot

Ocelot

    Pull my Devil Trigger

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 11:48 PM

There's a patch out that seems to improve the framerate. Still some drops in the Korok Forest, but places like Kakariko seem totally smooth now:

 

 

And I found this gif of someone riding a Guardian. He's actually exploiting the AI to steer it around; Guardians are programmed to move away from you when you get too close, so when he moves to one side of the Guardian's head it instinctively goes in the other direction:

 

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