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Neyo Wargear

Member Since 08 Apr 2012
Offline Last Active Today, 06:41 PM

#488309 The LEGO T71 Cadillac Motor Car Division Light Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 19 February 2019 - 09:50 PM

Part 2. Current work time: 30 minutes. Total work time: 3 hours and 30 minutes.

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P2.1: Decided to scrap the 1 wide gun mantlet and went for the simpler 2 wide gun mantlet.

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P2.2: Top of the turret all done.

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P2.3: The turret is complete.

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P2.4: Back of the completed turret.

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P2.5: Marriage of the turret and hull. The build is complete.

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P2.6: Back of the completed build.

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P2.7: Both T71's side by side.

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P2.8: Both T71's again.

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P2.9: Bird's eye view of the two.

Not in the mood to do a write-up right now.

Cheers.


#488302 Cappy's Minifig Menagerie

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 18 February 2019 - 06:40 PM

Another ragtag army, but a good ragtag army. I forget how varied armies are at times. I've always liked the Storm Trooper approach of everyone being the same.

The scalemail looks really good on the Frost Ravens, and you did great on the paint with Princess Adrianya!

Marcus looks dope as all get.

I also enjoy the throwback to Skorpiontowne!

Between you and Nightstalker, I feel a bigger need to commission Scorp for Lego or art.


#488300 Official Scorp's Minifigs Topic

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 18 February 2019 - 06:26 PM

The Sith look spot-on, I'll have to snag some of those decals sooner or later.


#488297 Art of a Wargear

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 18 February 2019 - 10:33 AM

Back.

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Sketches for a protagonist.

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Ma-66, a pachycephalosaurus encased in power armor.

Cheers.


#488282 The LEGO T71 Cadillac Motor Car Division Light Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 12 February 2019 - 08:57 PM

Greetings SSLFer's,

From one project unto the next.

The new project is the Cadillac Motor Car Division's version of the T71 light tank, the far more conventional design as compared to the Detroit Arsenal's proposal.

Let us begin with reference pictures:
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Part 1. Current work time: 3 hours. Total work time: 3 hours.

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P1.1: The T71 CMDC is a shorter vehicle than the T71 DA, due to the drive sprocket being in the front, meaning a front mounted transmission, and has a trailing idler like the M7 Medium Tank and M3/M5 Stuart of light tanks.

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P1.2: Like the M7 Medium Tank, the T71 CDMC has 3 differently sloped plates for the front hull. This take me a long time to figure out.

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P1.3: Went back and undid the entire front hull to see if I could figure it out by changing the distance of the lower glacia plate.

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P1.4: I eventually gave up on the slope technique I used on the M6A1 and M6A2E1 HT's and went with a boring plate technique.

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P1.5: I redid the headlights and finished the cupola for the Driver. Getting the fenders all figure out as well.

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P1.6: Again went with a brick solution for the sloping of the rear hull. I quickly learned this vehicle was going to be a challenge even though I was flying through this build.

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P1.7: I considered this done for the rear hull, but went back to add the tail lights to the vehicle. I don't think I have a screenshot of it.

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P1.8: This is when I hit a wall. The turret, not only is the gun mantlet perfectly translate into being 1x1 which makes it hard to do that on a turret that is 8 studs in diameter, but this is also an asymmetrical turret. The Americans loved to make these in the 50's and 60's. Funnily enough, American tanks with oscillating turrets were the only ones with symmetrical turrets at the time.

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P1.8: I copied the T71 DA turret into the file to copy the gun over. They're using the same gun so, yeah. You also see me using a very odd mounting system for the gun. We'll see how that goes.

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P1.9: The turret looks alright...

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P1.10: Here you see that I copied the cupola turret over from the T71 DA onto the T71 CMCD, again they're the same. American's started mounting these fat cupola turrets on all of their tanks to provide the commander access to a MG without exposing himself. I think they're pretty cool, but nowadays we have CROWS on our Abrams'.

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P1.11: Here you see me starting from scratch with a new turret design, while still trying to get the 1x1 gun mantlet to work. The thing about that though is that messes up everything else. So, I think I'm going to ditch trying to get it 1x1 and make it 1x2. Luckily the T71 DA had a 2x2 'gun mantlet'.

Cheers.


#488280 The LEGO T71 Detroit Arsenal Light Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 12 February 2019 - 11:32 AM

Part 4. Current work time: 1 hour and 19 minutes. Total work time: 4 hours and 54 minutes.

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P4.1: What an ugly design! Who's the idiot that made that? THROW IT AWAY!

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P4.2: Looking better, but not quite it. Also, why is that hideous abomination still on the hull? REMOVE IT HENCE!

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P4.3: There you go, looking better!

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P4.4: The inner machinations of the oscillating turret.

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P4.5: Nice and round, just like the real thing.

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P4.6: Turret is complete from the top.

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P4.7: The cupola turret (the smaller turret on top of the turret) came out decent methinks.

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P4.8: Marriage between the turret and hull. The build is complete!

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P4.9: Head-on view.

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P4.10: Profile view of this hellion.

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P4.11: Birds eye view of the T71 DA LT.

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P4.12: The rear of the little guy.

EXTRA PHOTOS:
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RESULTS:
The model came out well it being my first not only with a pike hull, but an oscillating turret as well. Even has a little cupola turret! The hull of the model is 16 studs or 3.33in long. Including the entire barrel it is 25 studs or 6.33in long. It is 10 studs or 3.33in wide.

This model would require a BrickArms monopod and M2HB Removable barrel for the GPMG (General Purpose Machine Gun) in the cupola turret.

HISTORY:
The T71 project began in 1952 and was to replace the M41 Walker Bulldog that had only been in production for 1 year (1951).The T71 Detroit Arsenal light tank began it's life in 1953. The M41 Walker Bulldog light tank of the United States was designed in 1949 and started production in 1951. The M41 Walker Bulldog had a good 76mm gun and was fast, but quite large and heavy for a light tank. It was an alright design, and the US decided they needed a new light tank already. When the Walker Bulldog was being designed, the prototypes T41 and T41E1 light tanks were being modified to become T49 light tanks. They wanted to put a 90mm gun on the T41/T41E1 hull, but without increasing the weight. So, they developed a short barrel, smoothbore with shallow rifling (Seems like that contradicts itself), low recoil 90mm gun. Then they had to design a turret with similar ballistic protection as the T41/T41E1 turrets, but could accommodate the larger 90mm, but still weigh the same. Thus, the T49 was born. The T49 then turned into the XM551 Sheridan with a 152.4mm or 6in gun launcher that could fire traditional rounds or ATGM's (Anti-tank Guided Missiles), which was standardized as the M551 Sheridan, the last standardized US light tank (Though you can argue the M2/M3 Bradley is a light tank). 
 
Anyway, let's jump back to 1953. There were three top designs to replace the M41 Walker Bulldog, Cadillac, AAI Corporation, and Detroit Arsenal had submitted them. AAI Corporation's design was the T92 light tank, it's really cool go check it out. While Cadillac made the T71 CMCD (Cadillac Motor Car Division), a more traditional design compared to Detroit Arsenal's T71. The T71 DA (Detroit Arsenal) was an interesting design as it had an oscillating turret with an autoloader, but also had a pike nose hull.
 
Before we delve too far into the history, the T71 light tank project's specifications were: max weight 20 tons, armed with a 90mm gun, and be air droppable. The specifications were soon changed to have a max weight of 18 tons, primary armament of a 76mm gun with a quick change barrel/tube.
 
Going back to the T71 DA LT, it was far more interesting than it's sister, the T71 CMCD. The T71 CMCD didn't get far, actually it had the least amount of progress of the 3 designs. One pro of the T71 CMCD was that it was estimated to be 5.5 tons lighter than the 18 ton maximum. The T71 DA had a crew of 3 instead of the typical 4, due to the human loader being replaced with an autoloader. The tank had a 6 round drum, a revolver, with 18 rounds on the ready rack and another 60 rounds as well. It had an impressive fire rate until the long reload of the drum, 6 rounds in about 20 seconds. It had a nice little AOI-629 engine (340hp) that gave it some speed and agility.
 
The T71 DA and T92 were to have full-scale mock-ups built. This is when the the T71 DA died, it had a full-scale wooden mock up, but the design was criticized for thin armor, maximum thickness of 25mm or 1in. 1956 is when all 3 projects were terminated. The Soviet PT-76 light tank helped kill the AAI Corp. T92 light tank due to being amphibious. The T92 LT was too far along to modify its design to be amphibious and thus the project ended. At least the M551 Sheridan is amphibious.
 
SPECIFICATIONS:
Weight: 18 tons
Length: Unknown
Width: Unknown
Height: Unknown
Crew: 3, Driver in hull with Commander and Gunner in turret.
Armor: ?-25.4mm or ?-1in.
Main Armament: M2A1 76mm Gun or T185 76mm Gun
Secondary Armament: M240 .3in GPMG (This is a guess)
Engine: AOI-628 (340 hp)
Speed: Unknown
Range: Unknown
 
FUN FACTS:
Neyo spends at least an hour on these write-ups! Sometimes it takes me 2 hours!


#488277 The LEGO T71 Detroit Arsenal Light Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 11 February 2019 - 11:06 PM

Part 3. Current work time: 1 hour. Total work time: 3 hours and 35 minutes.

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P3.1: Started working on the upper hull. The hull ceiling is a pentagon, so that's fun.

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P3.2: Finished the rear hull.

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P3.3: Almost done with the hull.

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P3.4: Hulls all done.

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P3.5: Ugly first oscillating turret attempt.

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P3.6: Good shaping, but can't get the oscillating part of the oscillating turret.

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P3.7: Here's the row of turrets I'm working on. This is going to be difficult due to this being an oscillating turret. Also, because it's my first one.

The thing about oscillating turrets is that they're two parts, the upper and lower. The lower allows horizontal movement while the upper allows gun elevation and depression. Both are connected by a trunnion at the top of the turret, which allows both to work together and move.

Just gotta try a lot of things to get this to work in the condensed space and look good.

Cheers.


#488269 The LEGO T71 Detroit Arsenal Light Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 10 February 2019 - 10:27 AM

Part 2. Current work time: 35 minutes. Total work time: 2 hours and 35 minutes.

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P2.1: I removed the two 1x2 plates from P1 as I began work on the upper glacis plates. Looks good, right?

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P2.2: Looks good, right? Not really. Why are these plates red instead of dark grey? I redid them because the earlier ones weren't working out.

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P2.3: This is the final result and I'm not going to mess with the pike nose anymore because this is the 10th attempt to getting it right. I wish I had taken screenshots for the other 8 attempts, haha. Anyway, I went back to having the 2 1x2 plates on the mounting and I had to remove one of the 2x8 plates to be able to get this to work.

Cheers.


#488263 The LEGO T71 Detroit Arsenal Light Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 09 February 2019 - 02:12 PM

Greetings SSLFer's.

A project ends, a new one begins.

As you can tell from the topic title my new project is the T71 Detroit Arsenal light tank. It's a rather interesting vehicle with an interesting story as well.

Let us begin with reference photos:
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Part 1. Current work time: 2 hours. Total work time: 2 hours.
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P1.1: As per usual I am starting with the suspension. Fun thing though is that there are no official dimensions for the T71 Detroit Arsenal (DA) light tank. So, I have to guess on everything. I spent a good while trying to figure out how much spacing I wanted between the roadwheels.

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P1.2: How the lower glacia plate of the pike nose attaches to the rest of the hull. I'm basing this on Brickmania's IS-3 Pike heavy tank model. The pike nose is a reference to the shaping of a tank's frontal hull that was invented by the Russians. It premiered on the IS-3 heavy tank, and some countries toyed with this concept.

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P1.3: How the lower glacia plate looks.

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P1.4: Here we jump to the back of the hull. Not very much going on here, primarily focusing on the frontal hull to get the pike nose done.

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P1.5: In this photo you see how I plan to mount the two upper glacis plates to finish off the pike nose. It may be too tall, we'll see. The yellow studs mark the start of the hull leveling out. Green studs denote where the turret starts.

Cheers.


#488262 The LEGO M6A1 (T1E1) Heavy Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 09 February 2019 - 12:15 PM

Looks gorgeous, Neyo!  I like how you give context with the historical facts and actual blueprints, too.  You pushed through the issues to make an outstanding product, and your tank build is magnificent, thanks to your efforts.


Thank you Lord Capulet! The history and blueprints give the model justice. Makes it more than just a pretty looking tank, it gives it life. There sure were lots of issues with this project, haha. In all honesty, once I found out the hull was an inch too long, I really thought about abandoning the project. Seems kinda petty, but after 6 hours of work and you were off is disheartening. Anyway, the vacation helped improve my mood substantially, but still took me a little bit to get back to it.

 

I appreciate the kind words Lord Capulet, now it is time to move onto the next project. 




#488257 The LEGO M6A1 (T1E1) Heavy Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 08 February 2019 - 09:36 PM

Extra project work time is 2 hours and 45 minutes. Total work time is: 17 hours and 18 minutes.

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P18.1: I redid the hull detailing. Very different then the stock T1E1, M6, and M6A1 heavy tank.

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P18.2: Here you can see the Driver, Co-Driver, and Assistant Loader. Starting to rework the frontal hull.

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P18.3: Here's the reworked hull.

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P18.4: How I mount the gun and allow movement.

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P18.5: Gun mantlet and frontal turret detailing.

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P18.6: Almost done with the turret.

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P18.7: Here is the completed turret on the modified hull.

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P18.8: Here is a profile of the M6A2E1.

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P18.9: Here is the head-on of the beast.

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P18.10: Another shot of the rear hull detailing and rear turret detailing.

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P18.11: Here is the M6A2E1 next to the M6A1, and you thought the M6A1 was big.

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P18.12: The two side by side. You can see how much longer the gun on the M6A2E1 is and how much larger the turret needs to be to mount it.

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P18.13: One last shot of the two.

RESULTS:
It looks darn good if I say so myself.

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Blueprint and picture of the real thing.

HISTORY:
Enter the Panzerkapmfwagen VI Ausf. B or King Tiger. The Americans didn't have really anything to pierce the front of this new threat. The only weapon that could was the T5E1 105mm gun. The only vehicle that was to mount this weapon was the T28 Super Heavy Tank (was re-designated as the T95 105mm Gun Motor Carriage and back to the T28 Super Heavy Tank). So, the US looked to the M6 series of heavy tanks.

The turret was similar to the T25 medium tank's turret. The new turret needed a larger turret bustle to allow room for the gun to recoil and to act as a counterweight. The turret ring had to be increased. The frontal hull armor had to be increased in order to take a hit from the German Panthers, Tigers, and King Tigers. They were going to remove all hull mounted MG's and move the periscopes of the Driver and Co-Driver. A new frontal plate that was to added at with the thickness of 180mm or 7in.

Two prototypes were made, both had lost their hull MG's, but did not receive the additional frontal armor. Eisenhower cancelled the order of 15 M6A2E1's due to being unneeded.

With the larger turret and gun, the weight of the M6A2E1 was 77 tons. They were not planned to receive an engine upgrade. The tanks had a hard time climbing hills due to an extra 20 tons.

Both vehicles were scrapped in the 1950's sadly.

The M6A2E1's turret later on developed into the T29 Heavy Tank's turret. Both mounted the same gun, but the T29 was far more similar to the M26 Pershing with the hull and suspension.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Weight: 77 tons
Length: Unknown
Width: 10ft, 2.5in
Height: Unknown
Crew: 6
Armor: 25.4-180mm or 1-7in
Main Armament: T5E1 105mm Gun (? rounds)
Secondary Armament: M2 0.5in cal HMG, flexible in pintle mount on turret (? rounds)
Engine: Wright G-200 (800hp)
Speed: Unknown
Range: Unknown


#488252 The LEGO M6A1 (T1E1) Heavy Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 06 February 2019 - 03:27 PM

Welcome to Part 17 or P17.

Work time is 30 minutes. Total work time: 14 hours and 33 minutes.

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P17.1: Almost done with the turret!

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P17.2: So, it shouldn't have taken 30 minutes to complete the turret assembly found in P16, but when I lowered the turret roof, I didn't need to do that. When I realized that, i was about to finish the turret and realized it didn't look right. So, I had to go back and increase the height by a stud and redo the turret roof.

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P17.3: Here is the turret married to the hull. The build is complete.

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P17.4: Profile view of the M6A1 (T1E3) Heavy Tank.

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P17.5: Head-on shot.

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P17.6: Birds' eye view.

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P17.7: Size comparison between my M7 medium tank and M6A1 heavy tank.

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P17.8: Another size comparison of the two.

RESULTS:
The model is 40 studs long, 18 studs wide, and I'm-not-going-to-stack-and-count-studs-for-height tall. It is quite tall. Like my M7 Medium Tank model, the M6A1 HT is too long, too wide, and too tall. This is fine as the there was no way to make it the right scale without sacrificing something. I'm sure a much better and skilled builder could do it, but not I.

This model would require a BrickArms M1919 LMG, and the LEGO 3 wide tracks.

As for my thoughts on this model, the hull and turret came out beautifully. The turret looks very similar to the real thing and I'm proud of that. Heck, even the side skirt came out well. I will not be going back to this model anytime soon. Though, I may have enough in me to make the M6A2E1-1 variant. Maybe I'll even make the possibly fictional upgraded front hull that is associated with the M6A2E1-1.

HISTORY:
The M6A1 started out as the T1 heavy tank proposal during May 1940 as a multi-turreted heavy tank, similar to the Russian T-35 heavy tank and British Vickers A1E1 Independent. It was to have two turrets with 75mm guns, a turret with a 37mm and coaxial .30cal MG, and a fourth turret with a 20mm and coaxial .30cal MG. Two .30cal MG's were to be mounted in the front hull and another 2 .30cal MG's to be in the rear corners of the hull. By October 1940, the designers realized that this design was stupid, and decided to go with a single turret. I'll call this the old or May T1 Heavy Tank. MG total: 7.
 

So, they decided upon having a primary 76.2mm or 3in gun and a secondary coaxial 37mm gun, both with a gyrostabilizer.. The turret had the MG cupola from the M3 Lee medium tank for the commander upon the turret roof with a .30cal LMG, and a .50cal HMG in the back roof of the turret for aircraft. A dual .50cal mount in the front hull for the co-driver, and 2 .30cal MG's again the front hull for the driver. This would be the new T1 Heavy Tank or October T1 HT. MG total: 6.

 

Some time during development we realized that we didn't need that many MG's. So, we removed the .50cal in the turret, the MG cupola, and one of the .30cal in the hull. Though, we did keep a .50cal on the turret roof in a pintle mount for aircraft. This would be known as the T1E1, and entered the scene in 1941. There were 3 prototypes, all 3 had an electric transmission (a hydramatic transmission variant was never completed), but one had a welded hull and the other two a cast one. The T1E1 was almost standardized as the M6A2 Heavy Tank. MG count: 4.

 

The T1E2 HT was had a cast hull and torque converter transmission, 8 built. It was standardized as the M6 Heavy Tank.

 

The T1E1 HT was the welded hull variant with a torque converter transmission, 12 built. This would be standardized as the M6A1 Heavy Tank, the one I made a model of. 

 

May 26th, 1942 both the M6 and M6A1 HT's were standardized, and production began in December of 1942 with an order of 5,000. This is when the rotor mounted .50cal HMG was removed and replaced with a pintle mounted .30cal, the MG cupola was replaced with a double door hatch, and one of the hull mounted .30cal's was removed. By now the Armored Corps had lost interest in the M6 and M6A1 HT's due to weight, height, reliability, and awkward internal layout, desired amount dropped to 100. By the end of 1942, the Armored Corps believed that the M4 Sherman MT was an adequate solution for the present and near future and stated they had no desire for a heavy tank. Production again cut to 40 in 1943.

 

During 1943, the T1E1 was tested with a T7 90mm gun and found to be satisfactory gun platform, but was criticized for the turret layout. By the end of 1943, the M6 was cancelled and no longer in production. December 14th, 1944, the T1E1, M6, and M6A1 HT's were all declared obsolete. A single T1E1 Heavy Tank survives it's brethren and was on display at the Aberdeen Proving Ground Museum, which recently closed, and is in long term storage for time unknown.

 

SPECIFICATIONS:

Weight: 63.25 tons

Length: 27ft, 8in

Width: 10ft, 2.5in

Height: 9ft, 10in

Crew: 6. Commander in turret

Armor: 25.4-101.6mm or 1-4in

Main Armament: M7 3in Gun (75 rounds)

Secondary Armament: M6 37mm Gun (202 rounds)

Tertiary Armament: M2 .50in HMG (5,700 rounds)

Fourth Armament: M1919A4 .30in LMG, in bow, and flexible in pintle mount (7,500 rounds)

Engine: Wright G-200 (800hp), also known as the Wright R-1820 Cyclone which was mounted on B-17 Flying Fortresses. 

Speed: 22MPH on roads

Range: 100mi on roads

 

FUN FACTS:

-The turret was modified and developed into the turret of the M10 Wolverine 3in Gun Motor Carriage (Tank Destroyer) mounting the same gun, M7 3in Gun which was mounted on a M4A2 Sherman MT hull. M10A1 Wolverine 3in GMC used the M4A3 Sherman MT hull.

-The M6 HT and M4 Sherman had the same turret ring diameter, meaning that you could have mounted the M6 turret on a M4 Sherman hull. The first Sherman, the M4A1(76)W, with a 76mm gun was deployed in 1944. The new 76 Shermans used the cancelled T23 Medium Tank's turret since they had the same turret ring diameter. So, back in 1942, we could have had Shermans with M6 turrets, meaning a better gun and better armor.

-With the T1E1 Heavy Tank being able to mount the T7 90mm gun, and not needing any modifications to the turret size to make it work, this also means that we could have had Shermans with a 90mm as well if we had mounted M6 HT turrets with the T7 90mm installed back in 1943.

-The M36 Jackson 90mm GMC was a modified M10A1 Wolverine TD with a slightly different turret and mounting a 90mm gun. It came out in 1944 as well. Basically, just a Wolverine with a 90mm.

-All in all, the US could have fielded better armored and armed Shermans since 1942 with a 3in gun and with a 90mm in 1943 just by using the T1E1, M6, and M6A1 turrets. The Wolverine and Jackson were M6 turrets on a Sherman hull. All we had to do was just stick the turrets on the hulls. Yes, these M6-M4 hybrids would have been slower, but when you have better armor and firepower, you don't need to flank tanks that have better armor and armament than you when you can penetrate them the same distance as you (Panthers and Tigers). You can now directly engage Panthers and Tigers without having to flank them due to being unable to penetrate their armor or having to call in a TD (Wolverine and Jackson) platoon to help out.

 




#488251 The LEGO M6A1 (T1E1) Heavy Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 06 February 2019 - 12:42 PM

Add another hour to the log. Total work time: 14 hours and 3 minutes.

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P16.1: I begin testing the experimental gun mantlet or gun mount shield found in P15 (Previous post).

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P16.2: I realize that the experimental gun mantlet isn't going to work. So, I redo it and start to build the turret around it.

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P16.3: Got the exterior done of the turret. Looks like an interesting bathtub.

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P16.4: I went back and lowered the rear turret by a stud to get the shaping for the slightly thinner turret roof. I am thinking about removing the trunnions detailing on the gun mantlet to allow more movement for the gun mantlet.

Let me know what you think.

Cheers.


#488249 The LEGO M6A1 (T1E1) Heavy Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 05 February 2019 - 06:44 PM

Another short update, add 35 minutes to the clock. Total work time: 13 hours and 3 minutes.

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Smoothed out the back portion of the hatches to allow more room for the turret.

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I realized the turret was too long by 2 or 3 studs, I don't remember. I also had to widen the turret by 2 studs. With the broader and shorter turret, it kinda has a bulldog appearance, at least to me.

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With the wider turret, I can widen the gun mantlet. With the extra 2 studs in length, I can get it to look more like the real thing.

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On the left is an experimental turret mantle, with the two end pieces, may be able to give the look of them being the trunnions that allow the elevation and depression of the main gun and co-axial 37mm.

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From the front.

Cheers.


#488248 The LEGO M6A1 (T1E1) Heavy Tank Project

Posted by Neyo Wargear on 05 February 2019 - 12:49 PM

Looking good so far! I really like the technique for the sloped section.


Thank you! I got the idea from the pre-2018 Brickmania M4 Sherman. It's the exact same section as well!

Short update. Add 13 minutes. Total amount of work: 12 hours and 28 minutes.
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I used the same sloping technique from P13, but before I could do that, I had to delete everything for the taller and longer sloped section to get this to work.

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Here's the section all detailed and finished.

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We are finally able to work on the turret again, which needs to be resized because it was based on the original hull.

Cheers.